Sunday, March 10, 2019

2018 MASCF


I've mentioned this several times before; this blog is not about timeliness. Here are some photos from the 2018 MASCF (Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival) held six months ago, October, 2018. MASCF is hosted by the CBMM (Cheasapeake Bay Maritime Museum) and is a good event to see what the non-racing boffins are coming up with, particularly the plywood DIY crowd. On the Saturday, when I made it over, there was little wind, but the on-shore kibbitzing was good.

There are a lot of riffs on the design of the basic Bolger Brick. There is the Puddle Duck Racer. Maybe the most popular is Michael Storer's OZ Goose. There was a larger, 3.6 meter, version at MASCF, promoting the formation of a racing league for these types.



You can't complain about the cockpit space on this small boat!


Definitely a paddle and oar day.


Another simple flat bottom design is the DC Dinghy. Posts on the DC Dinghy, here and here.


David Gentry does skin on frame boats. He designed this very pretty Chautauqu sailing canoe


David writes that he raced Chautauqu in the 300 mile Everglades Challenge. No way the blogmeister would even consider doing such a long trip in such a small boat.


John Harris, the ever prolific and out-of-the-box thinker, owner, and head designer of CLC boats, had this interesting craft, Pingu on the lawn of CBMM. From his writeup on CLC' website:
"Thus the subject design, the Nesting Expedition Dinghy. At 10'6" x 42", it's designed to be the smallest possible boat that will sail and row well, sleep a single person, and carry a week's worth of supplies. The bow and stern are removable, and stow in the 6-1/2-foot middle section. At worst, I can stash it in my little garden shed. At best, I can ship the thing to Europe to cruise the French canals."
For a more complete description of Pingu Click here.




Two leeboards, and a narrow, deep hull. Looks to me as definitely a flat water cruiser.


A mostly traditional, lashed up, proa, shared the lawn with Pingu.


Jim Thayer designed a commodious dink, the Wee Punkin, back in the 1990's. He did an improved version, the Punkin Eater, which showed up at the 2018 MASCF. Build is lapstrake sides married to a smooth bottom.


A really odd, but cool in its own way, circular cockpit.


A flattish hull shape.



3 comments:

Alden Smith said...

I love those simple easy to build plywood boxy boats - very cool and gets people on the water, quickly and cheaply - We have a lot to thank Bolger et al for.

Amy Smith Linton said...

OMG, they are adorable. I mean that in a very nautical way, but squee!

PS. It's been too long since I stopped by. I like the header photo, btw.

Tweezerman said...

Amy,

Always good to get a photo where you can watch a champion at work! Can you tell me what ever happened to Jamey Rabbit? Also how did the Everglade Challenge go this year?